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Bps Stortford 1939-45
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1902: Edward VII’s car approaches Market Square from Potter Street



Smith’s wine store shared this building with the post office, its rather grand public entrance visible on the right of the picture


These two pictures show the same building. It was originally a pub serving as a beer outlet for McMullens Brewery, and unique in the fact that it only opened for business on a Thursday – market day. Later, a third storey and attic room was added to give us the building we see now. The lamp light clearly seen positioned at the corner of the original building, is now placed between the two windows on the second floor of today’s building.


The Plume of Feathers Inn, first recorded in 1679, traded continually until 1960 when Joscelyne’s took possession to enlarge their store. Alterations made to the outer wall included large shop windows and the creation of a narrow colonnade along the pavement in Potter Street.


Clement Joscelyne bought this house in 1879 and transformed it into his furniture store.


The hustle and bustle of Market Square pictured in 1985. Joscelyne’s original building is in the background, as is their other outlet at that time, The Other Place.


In medieval times, this narrow street behind the Corn Exchange was the Fish Market – also known as Fish Row and Fish Street.


Now a small restaurant, this was once the Castle public house mentioned in Churchwardens accounts of 1681.


The Old Bell Inn is seen in the background behind the Corn Exchange.

The white painted Tuscan iron columns beneath the balcony originally supported the inside of the Exchange’s curtain wall, but were exposed during alterations in 1972

LEFT: An early print of the Corn Exchange designed in the neo-classical style by Lewis Vuliamy. RIGHT: An engraving by C.L. Tyler, dated 1828, shows the King’s Head Inn as it looked before demolition

Traders work beneath the Corn
Exchange’s glass roof.
It was added to the original
construction at a later date in
order to give dealers more
light by which to judge corn by

MARKET SQUARE PALMERS LANE CORN EXCHANGE CLEMENT JOSCELYNE
CURRIERS ARMS NOCKOLDS REINDEER INN SIR WALTER GILBEY

Website by Chris Ailey: chris@cpa-design.co.uk copyright© Paul Ailey 2004